Photographers to Know About

Top of the rue Champlain, photographed by Charles Marville in 1872. In the distance is where Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann’s pristine Paris rises
Top of the rue Champlain, photographed by Charles Marville in 1872. In the distance is where Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann’s pristine Paris rises. (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

“You might almost think of Charles Marville, the 19th-century photographer, as akin to the guys who drive around mapping streets for Google. He was a hired hand, an illustrator turned photographer near the dawn of the medium. Paris officials enlisted him to document, among other things, new parks and squares but also the streets, shops and tenements scheduled for demolition — to make, in essence, a historical record of a city soon to be lost.

That was the Paris of Victor Hugo and “Les Misérables,” which Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann, Napoleon III’s planning czar, was sweeping away to make room for the glittery, bourgeois metropolis that tourists love. The Metropolitan Museum of Art has a great show of Marville’s photographs from back then, when luxury apartment buildings were replacing old shops and homes, and many working people could no longer afford to live in their own neighbourhoods.”   New York Times

David Bailey's self-portrait taken in Singapore in 1957.
David Bailey’s self-portrait taken in Singapore in 1957.

 

“LONDON — “David Bailey makes love daily” was a witty ditty dreamed up in London’s swinging ’60s, when the photographer was believed to bed any model that stepped behind his lens.

There may have been a certain truth to the song, which also alluded to a “holy trinity” of sexually robust snappers who with their work broke down barriers of class and correct behavior throughout the decade.

“Before 1960, a fashion photographer was tall, thin and camp, but we are the opposite, short, fat and heterosexual,” said Brian Duffy who, with Terence Donovan and Mr. Bailey, made up a trio of bad boy photographers. ”  New York Times

 

 

Ezra Stoller (16 May 1915 – 29 October 2004) was an American architectural photographer.
Ezra Stoller (16 May 1915 – 29 October 2004) was an American architectural photographer.

 

“Ezra Stoller was the preeminent American architectural photographer; his images define Mid-Century Modernism. He worked from the late 1930s into the 1980s. Stoller’s images convey the three-dimensional experience of architecture through a two-dimensional medium with careful attention to vantage point and lighting conditions as well as line, color, form and texture. Among the iconic structures he photographed are Fallingwater, the Guggenheim Museum, the Seagram Building, and the TWA Terminal. Often the images are as familiar as the buildings they document. Ezra Stoller’s work included photographs of science and technology, factories and industrial production plus commercial and residential architecture. His work can be seen as social history as well as documents of design and construction.” http://ezrastoller.com